Dubious Radical

iwigglesworth:

johndoomedbutlovingitegbert:

pikanan:

florawrsaurus:

adamspong:

florawrsaurus:

science side of tumblr? explain?

levitate egg sackiatoo

yeah okay thanks hp fandom

the burning candle uses up all the oxygen in the bottle, which creates and a vacuum, and the resulting suction makes the egg go nyooom.

Thank you science side

It’s the heat not the oxygen. The air cools and lowers the pressure after being briefly heated. Oxygen when combusted is replaced by vapor and CO2.

Thank you geology side of tumblr

iwigglesworth:

johndoomedbutlovingitegbert:

pikanan:

florawrsaurus:

adamspong:

florawrsaurus:

science side of tumblr? explain?

levitate egg sackiatoo

yeah okay thanks hp fandom

the burning candle uses up all the oxygen in the bottle, which creates and a vacuum, and the resulting suction makes the egg go nyooom.

Thank you science side

It’s the heat not the oxygen. The air cools and lowers the pressure after being briefly heated. Oxygen when combusted is replaced by vapor and CO2.

Thank you geology side of tumblr

radicalg:

dubiousradical:

the new math common core is confusing as hell.

That’s just resistance to the new. First time seeing it, but this approach seems to allow for an easier transition to learning differently numbered base systems (like binary which is base-2). Also, it’s more like the way we do addition in our heads, it’ll be interesting to see if mental math will be easier for these kiddos

You make a good point (about the addition example). Although the old language and new language still doesn’t make sense to me. 
I guess I can kind of see how switching “problem” into “situation” would overall have a better effect on how students perceive math as “problem” carries a negative connotation.
I don’t see how “increase”, “decrease” and “compare” are new though…

radicalg:

dubiousradical:

the new math common core is confusing as hell.

That’s just resistance to the new. First time seeing it, but this approach seems to allow for an easier transition to learning differently numbered base systems (like binary which is base-2). Also, it’s more like the way we do addition in our heads, it’ll be interesting to see if mental math will be easier for these kiddos

You make a good point (about the addition example). Although the old language and new language still doesn’t make sense to me. 

I guess I can kind of see how switching “problem” into “situation” would overall have a better effect on how students perceive math as “problem” carries a negative connotation.

I don’t see how “increase”, “decrease” and “compare” are new though…

radicalg:

drainedblood:

Princeton Concludes What Kind of Government America Really Has, and It’s Not a Democracy | PolicyMic 
The news: A new scientific study from Princeton researchers Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page has finally put some science behind the recently popular argument that the United States isn’t a democracy any more. And they’ve found that in fact, America is basically an oligarchy.
An oligarchy is a system where power is effectively wielded by a small number of individuals defined by their status called oligarchs. Members of the oligarchy are the rich, the well connected and the politically powerful, as well as particularly well placed individuals in institutions like banking and finance or the military.
For their study, Gilens and Page compiled data from roughly 1,800 different policy initiatives in the years between 1981 and 2002. They then compared those policy changes with the expressed opinion of the United State public. Comparing the preferences of the average American at the 50th percentile of income to what those Americans at the 90th percentile preferred, as well as the opinions of major lobbying or business groups, the researchers found out that the government followed the directives set forth by the latter two much more often.
It’s beyond alarming. As Gilens and Page write, “the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.” In other words, their statistics say your opinion literally does not matter.
That might explain why mandatory background checks on gun sales supported by 83% to 91% of Americans aren’t in place, or why Congress has taken no action on greenhouse gas emissions even when such legislation is supported by the vast majority of citizens.
This problem has been steadily escalating for four decades. While there are some limitations to their data set, economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez constructed income statistics based on IRS data that go back to 1913. They found that the gap between the ultra-wealthy and the rest of us is much bigger than you would think…
(Read Full Text)

Siiiiiiigh

radicalg:

drainedblood:

Princeton Concludes What Kind of Government America Really Has, and It’s Not a Democracy | PolicyMic 

The news: A new scientific study from Princeton researchers Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page has finally put some science behind the recently popular argument that the United States isn’t a democracy any more. And they’ve found that in fact, America is basically an oligarchy.

An oligarchy is a system where power is effectively wielded by a small number of individuals defined by their status called oligarchs. Members of the oligarchy are the rich, the well connected and the politically powerful, as well as particularly well placed individuals in institutions like banking and finance or the military.

For their study, Gilens and Page compiled data from roughly 1,800 different policy initiatives in the years between 1981 and 2002. They then compared those policy changes with the expressed opinion of the United State public. Comparing the preferences of the average American at the 50th percentile of income to what those Americans at the 90th percentile preferred, as well as the opinions of major lobbying or business groups, the researchers found out that the government followed the directives set forth by the latter two much more often.

It’s beyond alarming. As Gilens and Page write, “the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.” In other words, their statistics say your opinion literally does not matter.

That might explain why mandatory background checks on gun sales supported by 83% to 91% of Americans aren’t in place, or why Congress has taken no action on greenhouse gas emissions even when such legislation is supported by the vast majority of citizens.

This problem has been steadily escalating for four decades. While there are some limitations to their data set, economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez constructed income statistics based on IRS data that go back to 1913. They found that the gap between the ultra-wealthy and the rest of us is much bigger than you would think…

(Read Full Text)

Siiiiiiigh

Hey, I just started using Verbage the other day and it has been GREAT. I was particularly excited for the LaTeX support. Is there currently any support at all for support for "\inline"? Would such a thing be impossible for a tumblr theme?

Hi lethargilistic,

I’m glad you’re excited about the theme. As far as I’m concerned, it should support inline. Although the way you write it might be different.

This website http://blog.dreasgrech.com/2009/12/jslatex-jquery-plugin-to-directly-embed.html should help.

hey, again! :) query: is there some preset code regarding embedded videos? Like I had this youtube video and any change in embed code won't show up in show of it's width. :(

Hi 1yrold,

My theme doesn’t have any preset code for embedded videos, however Tumblr treats them like as if you just pasted the URL so any changes in the embedded code won’t show up.

It’s better to paste the embed code in a text post (in the HTML section of course) because the change will actually show up.

Verbage →

themeguide:

Verbage has been made especially for writers on Tumblr.

Nice options for those who write include LaTeX support (for the scientific kind), Google Font integration and highlights for text.

My theme was featured in Theme Guide! I’m so honored. Thanks!

I remember first following their blog in the haydays when they used their own theme Telpher.

I could not have made any themes without them. The tutorial/booklet on Buildthemes is definitely a must read for any aspiring Tumblr theme builder

fdelopera:

rjdaae:

kellizredd:

ninjagiry:


There’re plenty musicals, where race doesn’t matter, but I’m totally against color-blind casting in POTO, Les Mis and other shows where it harms the historical authenticity.

Wow. Really on point there. I mean, it’s not as if France has been interacting with the African continent since the 8th century, ESPECIALLY not to the point where French is listed as an official language for several large countries. And as we know, there was absolutely NO cultural mingling between Africa and France, especially none where Africans were integrated into French society. And CERTAINLY not to the point of being of high historical, social, and political status. 
Hell, it’s not like there were any black artists of any kind in the 19th century.  The idea of black people being artists just hadn’t even been invented yet! And as we all know, there were absolutely no POC in the original Phantom of the Opera novel by Gaston Leroux, most definitely none that played major roles and altered the course of the plot. 
Good on you, OP. Truly you stand to uphold the gold standard of historical accuracy!


I think the point is that there wouldn’t be an African American constable in Revolutionary France. Good day.

Well of course there wouldn’t be an African American constable in Revolutionary France.
How silly.
He’d be French African, obviously.

Sigh. The only thing worse than a troll is a racist, ignorant troll.
Let’s talk about Le Fantôme de l’Opéra, the novel that ALW’s musical was based on, for a moment, shall we?
In Leroux’s novel, the Persian was obviously a person of color, that much is undeniable. So there goes the OP’s argument that there should be no people of color in Phantom. Despite the fact that the Persian was whitewashed in the musical and turned into a Caucasian Mme Giry (it is not clear whether she is Caucasian in the novel — see below), this does not erase the fact that Leroux didn’t intend for this character to be white.
So OP, stop making racist comments about the Phantom being played by a black actor, and start making legitimate complaints about how ALW’s musical does not represent the people of color in Leroux’s novel.
Next, Erik’s skin color in the novel and in the musical is not white or black — it is yellow (“Like yellow parchment is his skin…” etc.). So by the OP’s logic, only people with jaundice can play the role. Smh.
Finally, based on Gaston Leroux’s description, Meg Giry was a person of color — that is to say, she probably had African or Middle Eastern heritage (we don’t get a clear enough description of Mme Giry’s complexion to know whether this came from her side of the family, from her husband Jules’ side, or both).
Leroux writes: “la petite Giry, – des yeux pruneaux, des cheveux d’encre, un teint de bistre”
This means: “Little Giry — with prune-dark eyes, hair like ink, a brown complexion”
And yet, despite this clear description, this is how Meg Giry is portrayed in ALW’s musical:

Whitewashed much? If one wants to make the argument that the characters in the musical should be like their book counterparts, why isn’t Meg black?
So my advice to you, OP, is educate yourself before you go making racist and ignorant comments about topics that you clearly do not understand. Or if you do want to spout off like that, go talk to your friends offline and stop clogging up the Phandom with your hate.

fdelopera:

rjdaae:

kellizredd:

ninjagiry:

There’re plenty musicals, where race doesn’t matter, but I’m totally against color-blind casting in POTO, Les Mis and other shows where it harms the historical authenticity.

Wow. Really on point there. I mean, it’s not as if France has been interacting with the African continent since the 8th century, ESPECIALLY not to the point where French is listed as an official language for several large countries. And as we know, there was absolutely NO cultural mingling between Africa and France, especially none where Africans were integrated into French society. And CERTAINLY not to the point of being of high historical, social, and political status. 

Hell, it’s not like there were any black artists of any kind in the 19th century.  The idea of black people being artists just hadn’t even been invented yet! And as we all know, there were absolutely no POC in the original Phantom of the Opera novel by Gaston Leroux, most definitely none that played major roles and altered the course of the plot. 

Good on you, OP. Truly you stand to uphold the gold standard of historical accuracy!

I think the point is that there wouldn’t be an African American constable in Revolutionary France. Good day.

Well of course there wouldn’t be an African American constable in Revolutionary France.

How silly.

He’d be French African, obviously.

Sigh. The only thing worse than a troll is a racist, ignorant troll.

Let’s talk about Le Fantôme de l’Opéra, the novel that ALW’s musical was based on, for a moment, shall we?

In Leroux’s novel, the Persian was obviously a person of color, that much is undeniable. So there goes the OP’s argument that there should be no people of color in Phantom. Despite the fact that the Persian was whitewashed in the musical and turned into a Caucasian Mme Giry (it is not clear whether she is Caucasian in the novel — see below), this does not erase the fact that Leroux didn’t intend for this character to be white.

So OP, stop making racist comments about the Phantom being played by a black actor, and start making legitimate complaints about how ALW’s musical does not represent the people of color in Leroux’s novel.

Next, Erik’s skin color in the novel and in the musical is not white or black — it is yellow (“Like yellow parchment is his skin…” etc.). So by the OP’s logic, only people with jaundice can play the role. Smh.

Finally, based on Gaston Leroux’s description, Meg Giry was a person of color — that is to say, she probably had African or Middle Eastern heritage (we don’t get a clear enough description of Mme Giry’s complexion to know whether this came from her side of the family, from her husband Jules’ side, or both).

Leroux writes: “la petite Giry, – des yeux pruneaux, des cheveux d’encre, un teint de bistre”

This means: “Little Giry — with prune-dark eyes, hair like ink, a brown complexion”

And yet, despite this clear description, this is how Meg Giry is portrayed in ALW’s musical:

Whitewashed much? If one wants to make the argument that the characters in the musical should be like their book counterparts, why isn’t Meg black?

So my advice to you, OP, is educate yourself before you go making racist and ignorant comments about topics that you clearly do not understand. Or if you do want to spout off like that, go talk to your friends offline and stop clogging up the Phandom with your hate.

johnskylar:

megustamemes:

The best thing about pregnant women is free Wi-Fi.

Priority seat for the disabled, passengers who are currently hooked up to chemotherapy, women pregnant with robots, and ventriloquists.

johnskylar:

megustamemes:

The best thing about pregnant women is free Wi-Fi.

Priority seat for the disabled, passengers who are currently hooked up to chemotherapy, women pregnant with robots, and ventriloquists.

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